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Our Service Philosophy

CONTENT

To help the author develop and create the best book possible. Material that has both commercial appeal and long-term value.

CAREER

To help the author determine the next best step in their writing career. Giving counsel regarding the subtleties of the marketplace as well as the realities of the publishing community.

CONTRACT

To help the author secure the best possible contract. One that partners with the best strategic publisher and one that is mutually beneficial for all parties involved.

Recent Posts

Would You Buy Your Own Book?

by Steve Laube

buy-bookWhen I ask a room of writers if they would buy their own book if they saw it on the shelf at a major bookstore I am met with a variety of reactions. Laughter. Pensiveness. Surprise. And even a few scowls. How would you answer that question?

But the question is meant to ask if your book idea is unique. Whether it will stand out among the noise of the competition.

It is not a question of whether your book is important or valuable or even well written. It is ultimately a question of commercial viability.

You may heard it said that piracy is a problem for writers (and it can be). But I would agree with those who say that obscurity is an even greater problem. If no one knows about your book no one will steal it…and no one will buy it either!

This is why that competitive analysis portion of your proposal is so important. Help the agent help the publisher to create space on the physical store shelf but also on the virtual Internet store shelf. Help them position your book so that it rises from obscurity into viability.

This can be as “simple” as a dynamite title. Or it could be a strong platform that stand out in the crowd. Or the skill in the writing is so amazing that the book creates evangelists who will tell the world to read it.

So. Would you buy your own book if it was on the shelf next to an über-famous author on the same topic or in the same genre?

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Fun Words

I don’t usually stay up late enough to watch Conan O’Brien but awhile back I caught a show during which he campaigned to bring back use of the word thrice.

Thrice. Indeed, a fun word.

Yesterday Karen wrote about beautiful words so well that today I thought we could play with words and look at those that are entertaining. I’d like to suggest some other fun words that I think just aren’t used enough.

Slapdash

Because I’d rather negotiate contracts, send out proposals, and encourage writers, I employ a slapdash approach to housekeeping.

Draconian

While Steve Laube is draconian regarding book proposals, cooperative writers are rewarded with praise and contracts.

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Beautiful Words…100 of Them!

As someone who has studied other languages (French, Spanish, and Russian), I love the physicality of words. When you speak either French or Russian, your whole lower face gets a workout. It’s as though you’re tasting the words as well as speaking them.

Happily, English has words like that as well. Consider the following:

• impecunious
• circuitous
• mellifluous
• exsanguinate
• ebullient
• flummery

Words like these are not only fun to use, they’re fun to say. The feel of some even reflect their meaning. Impecunious has a tight, stingy feel to it. Mellifluous rolls off the tongue. Flummery feels a bit foolish as it escapes you.

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News You Can Use – Nov. 8, 2011

10 Great Tips for Self Editing – Teach these at a seminar and you’ll sound brilliant. Why? Because many writers have never considered them.

Self-Promotion Should Not Be a Dirty Word – Ronie Loren provides some excellent advice.

How Long Can Your Novel Be? – A case for the longer novel

Should Huckleberry Finn be changed? – Joseph Bentz looks into the question of modern day censorship of the classics.

An Author Fails to Deliver the Big Idea – Marshall Poe in ”The Atlantic” admits to failing to deliver an acceptable manuscript.

Is This the End of Books as We Know Them? – Scott Turow explores the future.

Congregation Versus Audience – Barnabas Piper talks about a common problem converting spoken words into written ones.

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