Tag s | Trivia

News You Can Use – Oct. 2, 2012

Why is the new J.K.Rowling e-book priced at $17.99? – This brief article presents some succinct economic details to help you further understand how this industry works.

Penguin Sues Authors for Advances Paid – There are at least two sides to every story, but this appears to be a number of cases where a writer signed a contract, accepted a sizeable cash advance, and never delivered the manuscript. There must have been previous attempts to get the money back for Penguin to resort to the court system to collect.

Get Paid More for your Freelance Work! – This article has 37 negotiating tips to improve your freelance editing income.

Congratulations to our clients Aaron McCarver, Diane Ashley, and Susan May Warren for winning the Carol Award for their fiction category. Click here for a complete list of winners and their book jackets. Well done!

The Accidental History of the @ Symbol – The origin of things like these is always fascinating to me. This article is from the Smithsonian Magazine.

The Importance of a Good Contract – “I Love Lucy” is worth $20 million annually…sixty years after the show aired.

My father, Roger G. Laube, passed away on September 15th and we recently held the burial and memorial services with family gathered from six states. He was a remarkable man who had an unwavering faith in God and a vigorous life in business, church, music, and family. He served as an incredible model for all who were touched by him. We love you Dad. You will be missed. An online memorial can be found at this link (http://bit.ly/QCg6tc). Included there is a full obituary and a “more photos” section. (Memorial gifts should be sent to Gideons International.). Picture to the left is from his 90th birthday, last year.

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15 Latin Phrases Every Writer Should Know

15 Latin Phrases Every Writer Should Know

Persona Non Grata
“An unwelcome person” (lately defined by some as a literary agent) Habeas Corpus
“You have the body”  (The legal right to appear before a judge.) Cogito Ergo Sum
“I think, therefore I am.” For a writer it would be “Sribo ergo sum” E Pluribus Unum
“Out of many, one” Quid Pro Quo
“This for that” or in other words, “You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours” Ad Hominem
“To the man” During an argument or discussion, when one party attacks their opponent’s reputation or expertise rather than sticking to the issue at hand. Soli Deo Gloria
“Glory to God alone” – a motto of the Reformation. Johann Sebastian Bach would sign his compositions with the initials S.D.G. Caveat Emptor
“Let the buyer beware” (before you use the “1-click” feature on Amazon.com) Memento Mori
“Remember your mortality” (also the name of an album by Flyleaf) Caveat Lector
“Let the reader beware”   (be nice to your reading audience!) Sui Generis
“Of its own kind,” or “Unique” – a key principle in copyright or intellectual property law Veni, vidi, vici
“I came, I saw, I conquered” – A message supposedly sent by Julius Caesar to the Roman Senate to describe a battle in 47 BC. For the writer? “Veni, vidi, scripsi” (I came, I saw, I wrote) Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam
“For the Greater Glory of God” – see 1 Corinthians 10:31. Johann Sebastian Bach also used the initials A.M.D.G. Mea Culpa
“By my fault” – or in common language today, “My bad.” Pro Bono.
“Done without charge” – Incorrectly used by fans of U2.
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Word Trivia

Word Trivia

“Stewardesses” and “reverberated” are the two longest (and commonly used) words (12 letters each) that can be typed with only the left hand.

“lollipop” is the longest word typed with your right hand.

The only 15 letter word that can be spelled without repeating a letter is uncopyrightable.

No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver, or purple.

“Dreamt” is the only English word that ends in the letters “mt”.

The sentence: “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog” uses every letter of the alphabet.

The words ‘racecar,’ ‘kayak’ and ‘level’ are the same whether they are read left to right or right to left (palindromes).

There are only four words in the English language which end in “dous”: tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous.

There are two words in the English language that have all five vowels in order: “abstemious” and “facetious.” (a e i o u)

Typewriter is the longest word that can be made using the letters only on one row of the keyboard.

A “jiffy” is an actual unit of time for 1/100th of a second.

The only city whose name can be spelled completely with vowels is Aiea, Hawaii.

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