Fun Fridays – October 20, 2017

A change of pace today.

Do yourself a favor. Set aside 10 minutes. Turn up your speakers. Quiet your mind and heart. Close your eyes. Then play this video. The song “Alleluia” by Eric Whitaker is performed. (There is nothing to watch, only the album cover is displayed.)

While you let the music wash over you, pray.
Lift your burdens before the One and Only One who can help you carry your burdens.

Martin Luther wrote, “My heart, which is so full to overflowing, has often been solaced and refreshed by music when sick and weary.”

Dietrich Bonhoeffer wrote, “Music… will help dissolve your perplexities and purify your character and sensibilities, and in time of care and sorrow, will keep a fountain of joy alive in you.”

In our world aggrieved by turmoil, tragedy, evil, loss, and pain it is my prayer that for these few moments your spirit can find comfort.

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“When a spouse greets a partner with derision because of an opinion, what should be ___ reaction?”

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So what is correct?

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