Fun Words

 

I don’t usually stay up late enough to watch Conan O’Brien but awhile back I caught a show during which he campaigned to bring back use of the word thrice.

Thrice. Indeed, a fun word.

Yesterday Karen wrote about beautiful words so well that today I thought we could play with words and look at those that are entertaining. I’d like to suggest some other fun words that I think just aren’t used enough.

Slapdash

Because I’d rather negotiate contracts, send out proposals, and encourage writers, I employ a slapdash approach to housekeeping.

Draconian

While Steve Laube is draconian regarding book proposals, cooperative writers are rewarded with praise and contracts.

Phalanx

Popular agents and editors face a phalanx of proposals upon returning from conferences.

Twixt

There’s a lot of work twixt writing a proposal and getting a book published.

Ribald

We are never allowed to be ribald in CBA.

Lickety-split

I can do my slapdash housework lickety-split!

Fractious

Incoherent proposals make me fractious.

Tolerable

Oh, I’m feeling tolerable today. How about you?

 

Serious words everyone needs to say more often. Seriously:

I love you.

You are beautiful.

I thank God for you every day.

 

Your turn:

What are some fun words you like?

Leave a Comment

Beautiful Words…100 of Them!

As someone who has studied other languages (French, Spanish, and Russian), I love the physicality of words. When you speak either French or Russian, your whole lower face gets a workout. It’s as though you’re tasting the words as well as speaking them.

Happily, English has words like that as well. Consider the following:

• impecunious
• circuitous
• mellifluous
• exsanguinate
• ebullient
• flummery

Words like these are not only fun to use, they’re fun to say. The feel of some even reflect their meaning. Impecunious has a tight, stingy feel to it. Mellifluous rolls off the tongue. Flummery feels a bit foolish as it escapes you.

Read More

News You Can Use – Nov. 8, 2011

10 Great Tips for Self Editing – Teach these at a seminar and you’ll sound brilliant. Why? Because many writers have never considered them.

Self-Promotion Should Not Be a Dirty Word – Ronie Loren provides some excellent advice.

How Long Can Your Novel Be? – A case for the longer novel

Should Huckleberry Finn be changed? – Joseph Bentz looks into the question of modern day censorship of the classics.

An Author Fails to Deliver the Big Idea – Marshall Poe in ”The Atlantic” admits to failing to deliver an acceptable manuscript.

Is This the End of Books as We Know Them? – Scott Turow explores the future.

Congregation Versus Audience – Barnabas Piper talks about a common problem converting spoken words into written ones.

Read More

A Matter of Taste

I always enjoy reading comments on our blog posts. Recently a reader posted a provocative question:

In this time of great emotional upheaval, instability, and unrest, aren’t we ready for something more solid and inspiring than just different types of romance novels?

Those of you familiar with my career know that I am the author of many romance novels and stories — and Bible trivia books!

And while I represent a variety of authors in fiction and nonfiction, my list is weighted heavily to romantic stories. I do realize that not everyone has the same taste — nor should we.

Read More

Any Regulatory Issues with the Purchase of Thomas Nelson by HarperCollins?


By most accounts the purchase of Nelson by HarperCollins will put the #1 largest Christian Publishing house under the same ownership as the #2 largest Christian Publishing House (Zondervan). The press release mentions that the sale “is subject to customary regulatory clearance.”

It will be interesting to see if the Department of Justice cares about Christian publishing, or even understands it.  Over in the telecommunications industry they are blocking the merger between ATT and T-Mobile, which are #1 and #4 in wireless service.  With the purchase of Nelson, it is combining #1 and #2.  So it should come under some scruitiny.  But it might not because:

The DOJ might not understand the Christian book business. 
Read More

Perspective on the Sale of Thomas Nelson Publishers

In light of yesterday’s announcement of the sale of Thomas Nelson Publishers to HarperCollins I thought I would write a few thoughts.

Without question this is the biggest news story in the Christian publishing industry this year, if not the last few years. Most of us have been caught flat-footed. Partly because Thomas Nelson is such a large company. And partly because they were just purchased by an investment group last year. The other surprise is the buyer. HarperCollins has owned Zondervan since 1988 which is a direct competitor to Nelson. They publish some of the same authors. (And by the way, HarperCollins is owned by NewsCorp…whose owner is Rupert Murdoch.)

Back in 2002 when I was still with Bethany House Publishers we were sold to Baker Books. So I’ve seen some of the inside of a publishing sale. There will be some obvious echoes to our experience, but Zondervan and Nelson are very different from Bethany House and Baker.

Ten Random Thoughts

Read More

More on the Purchase of Thomas Nelson by HarperCollins

One bit of speculation about the sale of Thomas Nelson to HarperCollins comes from PaidContent.org written by Laura Hazard Owen: “Thomas Nelson has been on the forefront of experimentation with digital publishing, and HarperCollins is buying not just the company but also that digital experience….Thomas Nelson has done a bunch of …

Read More

HarperCollins Buys Thomas Nelson Publishers

BREAKING NEWS! Startling industry news. HarperCollins will purchase Thomas Nelson by the end of this calendar year. HarperCollins already owns Zondervan (which they purchased in 1988). The combination will create the largest and most dominant Christian publishing company in the world. Wow. Here is the official press release.

Read More

C.S. Lewis on Writing

by Steve Laube

On June 26, 1956, C.S. Lewis replied to letter from an American girl named Joan with advice on writing:

Always try to use the language so as to make quite clear what you mean and make sure your sentence couldn’t mean anything else. Always prefer the plain direct word to the long, vague one. Don’t implement promises, but keep them.
Read More