En-TITLE-ment: Finding the Perfect Title (Part Two)

First, here are the answers to last week’s questions:

Name That Tone!

The Boneman’s Daughters–chilling

Redeeming Love–romantic

The Shunning–Amish

The Riddlemaster of Hed–fantastical

A Vase of Mistaken Identity–whimsical

Without a Trace–suspensful

Three Weddings & a Giggle—humourous and romantic

Name that Genre!

Kidnapped–adventure

Sister Chicks Down Under—witty women’s fiction

The Lightkeeper’s Ball—historical romance

Deadly Pursuit—suspense

The Twelfth Prophecy, A.D. Chronicles—biblical fiction

Okay, now, on to Tip #3 for crafting strong titles. As USA channel puts it, Characters welcome! Ever and always, Keep Your Characters in Mind. Sometimes the best title for a book focuses on the character. But not just on the name, though that can work well. You can also base a title on your character’s:

  • Personality
  • Personal struggle
  • Conflict with other characters
  • Lesson learned
  • Nickname
  • Nationality
  • Flaw
  • Physical characteristics
  • Occupation or calling

…and so on. Look at all the facets of your character to see if there’s something that would lend itself well to an eye- and imagination-grabbing title. Also, remember that these kinds of titles can often lead to wonderful designs.

Also, remember that your location can be considered a character as well. Certain regions, states, or countries tend to have personalities, so to speak. Build on that for a title that creates the image of your story before the reader has even hit page one.

Some examples of character-based titles:

Name

Magdalene (interesting that they chose Magdalene rather than Mary Magdalene. Used the far more negative/emotional portion of the name for the title)

Rachel’s Secret

Here Lies Arthur

Ruby’s Slippers (outstanding cover art enhances the name and tongue-in-cheek connection to Wizard of Oz. See below!)

Physical Characteristic

The Eye of Jade (cover design played off this title beautifully. See below.)

The Face

The Bluest Eye

Character’s struggle or “state”

A Bride in the Bargain

Daughter of Liberty

Deceived

Snow Angel

Personality

The Duchess & the Dragon (gives you a strong sense of the heroine and hero, right up front)

Sisterchicks in Wooden Shoes (this title uses location as well)

That Certain Spark (the cover art is what makes this title so effective! See cover below.)

Location as a character

The Shack

What the Bayou Saw

Savannah from Savannah (wonderful mix of name and location)

Texas Angel

Occupation/Calling

Guardian of the Flame

The Alchemist

The Night Watchman

     

Any others you can think of to illustrate this tip?

 

 

 

 

 

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News You Can Use

World’s Highest Paid Authors – According to Forbes – August 2011.

Four Top Twitter Feeds for Book Lovers

How an Author Can Use Google+ – Fascinating new social network. Worth adding to your circle? And click here for a complete guide to Google+.

Who Do You Write Like? – This little word game has you paste clips of your writing and it tells you which classic author your style echoes. Mine? H.P. Lovecraft, who is probably best known as a writer of weird fiction. How is that for irony?

The Danger of Using Stock Photos – The Caustic Cover Critic blog found these three book covers that use the same image.

Presidential Reading List – This is a list of the 23 books President Obama has read since he took office. Here is a list of his Summer Reading List according to ABC News. And here is a link to a discussion of the 95 books President Bush read in 2006.

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The Woman Behind the Man

by Steve Laube

Thirty years ago today a beautiful young lady said “I do” and we have been married ever since. They say that behind every good man is an even better woman. I couldn’t agree more. Through the ups and downs of life, my wife Lisa has been the foundation of our home and raised three incredible daughters.

I can safely say that The Steve Laube Agency would not be what it is today without her efforts behind the scenes. Her consistent prayers, her pursuit of God, and her love for me have made it all possible. She has been there through every agonizing twist and turn.

My sentimental side lacks a little polish and words tend to fail me. So in a simple way, today on our 30th wedding anniversary, I would like to honor my wife and say “I love you” and “Thank you for all that you do.” I am humbled to be married to such an amazing woman of God.

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Coming Full Circle

by Kim Vogel Sawyer

Today’s guest blog is from Kim Vogel Sawyer a best-selling author whose books have topped the sales charts and won awards since 2005, when she left her elementary school teaching job to write full time. Her books have won the Carol Award, the Gayle Wilson Award of Excellence, and the Inspirational Readers Choice Award. Her stories are designed to offer hope and encouragement to her readers. Kim sees a correlation between the writing of a good story and God’s good plan for every life, and she hopes her stories encourage readers to seek God’s will in their own personal lives. Bestselling author Tracie Peterson says: “Kim Vogel Sawyer is an exceptional storyteller who is sure to please fans of historical fiction. Her attention to detail and love of God shines through.”

In addition to writing, Kim Vogel Sawyer is a popular speaker, freely sharing her testimony of God’s grace and healing-both physical and emotional-in her life. She and her husband Don reside in Hutchinson, Kansas, and have three daughters and four grandchildren. She is active in her church and loves singing, acting, playing handbells, quilting, and chocolate!

__________

In 2002, as my health was crumbling to the point that full-time teaching was no longer a possibility and I didn’t know what I was going to do, my dad–feeling as though I needed a major lift–took it upon himself to make my publishing dream come true. He sent a story I’d written, titled A Seeking Heart, to Steve Laube, who, at the time, owned a self-publishing company called ACW Press. And Steve agreed to help me get it into print.

Thus began a journey beyond the scope of my wildest imaginings.

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En-TITLE-ment: Finding the Perfect Title (Part One)

One of the most difficult—and important—things we did when I worked in the publishing house was come up with titles for our authors’ novels. Sometimes it was a breeze, either because the author’s title was spot-on or because the story lent itself organically to a certain title. But more often than not, it was a long process of back-and-forth with the author, marketing, and sales. So how can you, the author, develop a title that works well? Give the following tips a try.

1. Tone. Be sure your title reflects the tone of your story accurately.

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News You Can Use

Non-Fiction is True, Fiction is Un-True – Tony Reinke explodes this myth.

Campus Crusade Changes its Name – No longer call Campus Crusade by that name. It is now called Cru. This is not a prank, it is the real deal. One scalpel edged writer has some pointed things to say about the change.

The Difference Between Buzz and Word-of-Mouth – Matt Perman makes a simple definition to help clarify.

Top Ten Differences Between the Published and the Self-Published – Robert Chazz Chute discussed the main reasons that separate the two groups. Ending quote: “It used to take a powerful store of hope to be a self-published author. Now more faith is demanded of my traditionally published friends.”

Nine Things Successful People Do Differently – a great article from the Harvard Business Review. Number four is my favorite: “Be a realistic optimist.”

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Back to School?

by Steve Laube

Depending on where you live and your school district policies you may already be in a back-to-school mode or preparing for it.

It got me to thinking about the need for all writers to always have a “back to school” mentality.

Here are five things we can learn from always going “back to school.”

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Responding to Criticism

When someone tells me she’s not sure she wants me to read her manuscript, I know she’s not ready for publication. Such sentiment shows a lack of confidence and a fear of both rejection and criticism. Even though readers usually treat writers with respect, a critical word can puncture the heart.

Imagine the wounds delivered on Internet sites such as Amazon from readers who lack that respect. A major complaint I hear from distraught authors is that people download free Christian novels and then post hostile reviews. A cursory bit of research reveals some say they felt duped because they didn’t realize they were downloading a Christian novel. It is likely they just grabbed it because it was free and did not look at other reviews or the book’s description. These readers aren’t victims of duplicity, they were, at the very least, lazy and then blamed others when the book wasn’t to their taste. Unfortunately the temptation is for the author to strike back with a serrated reply.

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